Monday, September 8


The  Film Fatales let you know if it is worth taking The Hundred-Foot Journey.

2014. Rated PG. 122 Minutes. Starring  Helen Mirren, Om Puri, Manish Dayal, Charlotte Le Bon.  Directed by Lasse Hallström (Chocolat, What is Eating Gilbert Grape, Salmon Fishing in Yemen, and a personal favorite of one of the Film Fatales: My Life as a Dog).

The Kadam family leaves India for France where they open a restaurant directly across the road from Madame Mallory's Michelin-starred eatery. (IMDb)




elizabeth: Sometimes I think movies came to be as purely a form of escape from the world. Give us two hours and we can transport you to places you might not otherwise visit. Let us show you strength and resilience in a character or two and you might leave feeling inspired and also feeling a little silly from crying and moaning about things that you won’t remember next week or even tomorrow. End of rant.

There was a lot of hype about The Hundred-Foot Journey and I would like say that the hype was right on. The storyline is about the Kadam family from India who leave all behind in search for a better and safer life in France. One thing they know for sure is that the elder son, Hassan (played by the oh-so-handsome and charismatic Manish Dayal) inherited his mother’s gift to create culinary wonders. But then the fun begins in the form of Helen Mirren’s (The Queen, Hitchcock, The Debt) uptight and bitchy Madam Mallory. It seems the old girl has no other life than the restaurant that stands 100 feet from the Maison Mumbai.

Nicole: (I concur regarding Dayal – I suspect he’s going to become quite sought after. He certainly has the makings of a heartthrob.) This film was a delight for the eyes, as well as the mind. Set against the loveliest of French countryside backdrops and intermixed with the culinary arts, you’re sure to leave in the mood to travel and savor never-tasted cuisine.

I enjoyed the interplay between Madam Mallory and the Kadam patriarch, played by Om Puri—as well as the budding, yet complicated, romance between Hassan and Marguerite (Le Bon). But what was most interesting about this film was the “journey” taken by Hassan. It ends not where you’d expect it, but you’ll be pleased by his choice. That’s all I’ll say – I don’t want to spoil it.

elizabeth: While I found The Hundred-Foot Journey to be in the “ charming movie” category, please know that is deals with great loss and discrimination against people who don’t look like us. But the characters rise above the enormous hurt and loss and made a new life while they honored the old. The Kadam family and Madame Mallory showed what was really important in life -- a good cooked meal and not having to do clean up. Okay, they teach us that the good life does not end because of pain or loss. And Madame Mallory will surprise you, but then again, can Helen Mirren do anything wrong? 

Nicole: No, she cannot. Even if it’s a crappy movie, she redeems it. Not many actors can do that.

elizabeth: I have the urge to make an omelet.


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